Crowdsourcing A Design Solution

After our renovation of the reception area at Cardamom County last year, we decided to leave the largest wall–a spectacular, privileged space for art–completely white until we found exactly the right piece.  Given the property’s location in the hills where the best cardamom in the world grows, we formed a vision for a piece of art that would abstract cardamom in some beautiful way.  We spoke to the director of the government’s cardamom research laboratory, thinking they might have some molecular images of cardamom (more on which after the jump) but they did not.  And so we dropped that idea, but we are still looking.  And that is how we happened upon the image above, and the description of this and others by the same artist on a Japanese design website:

Using his background in computer graphics and illustration, media artist Makoto Murayama creates technical, scientific blueprints of flowers that look like they belong in a manual for semiconductors. In fact, his work has just been selected as part of thesolaé art gallery project, an initiative to bring art into the offices of Tokyo Electron, one of Japan’s largest semiconductor companies.

It’s no surprise that these incredibly detailed renderings are made from an incredibly scientific process. The 29-year old Murayama begins by collecting and studying different flowers. The artist then begins sketching them over and over, literally dissecting every petal under a microscope to identify its structure. Murayama then turns to his computer, where he carefully models and renders out the prints. I would love to have one of these on my wall!

“My inspirations come from Yoshihiro Inomoto (a master of automobile illustration) and Tomitaro Makino (a pioneer in Japanese botanical illustration),” says Murayama in an interview.

We still have our design work challenge, and we now turn to you for any reference you may have that can help us achieve our goal.  First, take a look at the original inspiration for this idea.  Florida State University has a whole website dedicated to online resources for those interested in microscopic images, and this particular subset struck our fancy.

Whiskey is a spirit drink distilled from grain containing a portion of barley malt. There are many variations of whiskey including bourbon, Irish, rye, and scotch. The one we choose to photograph is Jack Daniels single grain sour mash whiskey.

Whiskey is a spirit drink distilled from grain containing a portion of barley malt. There are many variations of whiskey including bourbon, Irish, rye, and scotch. The one we choose to photograph is Jack Daniels single grain sour mash whiskey.

In addition to whiskey, there are most other well known spirits, as well as mixed drinks, photographed at the molecular level.  We were impressed then, and we still are now, that someone thought to set up the equipment to take these photographs; and it was mighty thoughtful of that university to host the photos and provide historical context to the subject of each one.

Gin is said to have originated in England, being adapted from the Dutch drink Jenever sometime in the 1500s. The best gins are made by redistilling spirits from grain alcohol through a bed of juniper berries, while the cheaper varities are flavored after distillation.

Gin is said to have originated in England, being adapted from the Dutch drink Jenever sometime in the 1500s. The best gins are made by redistilling spirits from grain alcohol through a bed of juniper berries, while the cheaper varities are flavored after distillation.

Now, who among you can help us find something equivalent for cardamom?  We will make it worth your while.  Meanwhile, for the sake of inspiration…

Native to the Caribbean, rum is a liquor of choice in over 500 different cocktails.

Native to the Caribbean, rum is a liquor of choice in over 500 different cocktails.

3 thoughts on “Crowdsourcing A Design Solution

  1. Pingback: Photogenic Food | Raxa Collective

  2. Pingback: Food, Water And Conservation | Raxa Collective

  3. Pingback: Upcycling Mattanchery |

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