Birding By Season

Violet-crowned, blue-throated and magnificent hummingbirds, along with a dozen other bird species, have been recorded at the the Conservancy’s 380-acre Ramsey Canyon Preserve. © Teagan White

Violet-crowned, blue-throated and magnificent hummingbirds, along with a dozen other bird species, have been recorded at the the Conservancy’s 380-acre Ramsey Canyon Preserve. © Teagan White

Thanks once again to the Nature Conservancy’s Cool Green Science blog for simultaneously highlighting conservation history as well as inspiration to spend time outdoors. We stand with the TNC and all organizations in support of the legendary legislation that illustrates the core principles of wildlife and land stewardship.

The Audubon Society states it simply, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act protects birds from depredatory human activities. And the more we involve ourselves in birding activities, the more appreciation and awareness we have for the fragility of our ecosystems and the biodiversity they sustain.

 A Birding List for the New Year

In 2016, birders celebrated the centennial of the signing of the United States’ Migratory Bird Treaty. In 1918, the resulting legislation became one of the country’s first major pieces of environmental law. Today birders reap the benefits of the act, which barred, among other things, the hunting of migratory birds during nesting and mating seasons.

In Nature Conservancy magazine’s most recent issue, TNC’s migratory birding program director, Dave Mehlman, wrote about the importance of the act and a few key birding sites. Here are 10 more places he likes to visit that have benefited from the Migratory Bird Act.

Spring

Along the Saugatuck Trail in Devil’s Den. Photo © Alden Warner

Along the Saugatuck Trail in Devil’s Den. Photo © Alden Warner

Devil’s Den, Connecticut

Visitors to the Conservancy’s largest contiguous Connecticut preserve, Devil’s Den, will see the greatest diversity of birds during the area’s peak migratory season: April to June. Look for migrants with such colorful names as the yellow-throated vireo, the worm-eating warbler and the rose-breasted grosbeak.

Disney Wilderness Preserve, Florida

Each spring, hundreds of endangered wood storks arrive at the preserve in central Florida where they flock to the bald cypresses to roost. Scientists closely study these pairs to help gather information to further protect the species. Other birds found there include sandhill cranes, Florida scrub-jays, and the reintroduced red-cockaded woodpeckers.

Summer

A broad-billed hummingbird—one of the species found in Patagonia-Sonoita Creek, in Madera Canyon, Arizona. Photo © Dick Dickenson

A broad-billed hummingbird—one of the species found in Patagonia-Sonoita Creek, in Madera Canyon, Arizona. Photo © Dick Dickenson

Patagonia-Sonoita Creek Preserve, Arizona

As many as 15 hummingbird species migrate through Ramsey Canyon Preserve and nearby Patagonia-Sonoita Creek Preserve near the Arizona border with Mexico. Mehlman suggests visiting in August for the best chance to see migratory birds. Mark off birds on the Patagonia-Sonoita birding checklist as you go.

Great Egret Marsh, Ohio  

The birds for which Great Egret Marsh Preserve is named can be seen wading the shallows there in summer. A 1.2-mile trail loops through the marsh to give visitors a peek at birds like the great blue heron and spotted sandpipers.

Click here for the full lists for all four seasons.

One thought on “Birding By Season

  1. Pingback: UNIDOS POR LA LIBERTAD, La imagen también es poesía. – videlmonuneztarrillo

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