Warndon Woodlands Local Nature Reserve’s Bat-Friendly Lighting

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A common pipistrelle in flight at night. Photograph: FLPA/Alamy

IMG_1145.JPG.jpgThe title of this post is a mouthful, and is a bit of a random walk. We had not heard of Warndon Woodlands Local Nature Reserve before today. But now that we have been to their website we are happy to imagine a walk in the woods in that part of the UK. It seems a civil place, perhaps a refuge from all sorts of noise invading our lives these days:

Access: Pedestrian entrances from Parsonage Way, public footpaths through adjacent fields.

Site Facilities:
waymarked trail, public footpaths, interpretation board

Open: Pedestrian access 24hrs.

Dogs: Well behaved dogs welcome, please be aware there may be cattle in the fields nearby.

Habitat: Ancient Semi-natural Woodland, Recent Secondary Woodland, Hedgerows

Notable Wildlife: Great Spotted Woodpecker, Jay, Bluebell, Buzzard, Sparrowhawk, Muntjac deer.

Other features: Original bank and ditch boundaries of the wood are still visible today.

And we are happy to read about their care for bats.Thanks to the Guardian for this small item from Worcester:

How did the bat cross the road? By going to a safe red-light area

Worcester is putting LED lighting to innovative use to protect white-light-shy locals

Bats in Worcester are to get their own red-light area. LED bulbs that emit a red glow will provide bats with a 60-metre-wide crossing area on the A4440, near to Worcester’s Warndon Woodlands nature reserve.

Worcestershire county council said research had shown that some species of bat are light shy and will not cross roads lit by white lights, which can stop them finding food and water. Standard street lights also attract insects that bats feed on, reducing the supply available in their feeding areas.

The red-light scheme – believed to be a first for UK bats – will be installed to overcome these problems but also ensures the safety of all road users, said Ken Pollock, a local councillor. “These lights are a great example where we have been able to adapt the usual standards to better suit the local environment. The adapted lighting may look a little different at first, but we’d like to assure those using the area at night that the colour of the lights has been through stringent testing and adheres to all safety checks.”

Visibility for drivers and pedestrians is not affected by the red light and the scheme is fully compliant with the required standards, the council added.

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